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« Some Q & A about the Esselstyn Diet Challenge. Why Do It? What about Oil & Fat-Soluble Vitamins? What About Omega-3s? And My Top Recipe Picks of Week Three | Main | Final Week on the Esselstyn Plant-Based No-Added Oil Diet Trial. What's Changed? What Have I Learned? Tips and This Week's Favorite Recipes »

July 17, 2010

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Plant-Based Eating Confusion! Omega-3s, Omega-6s, Glycemic Index, ORAC Index and More. A Picture, a Chart, and the ANDI Rankings Help Clear the Confusion.:

Comments

MB

Where can we find all of these great recipes you're trying?

Jerry

Thanks, this is a lot of great information. I would point out that ANDI covers nutrient density very well, but it doesn't take into account energy needs. I eat the high ANDI foods for their nutrition, but I also eat potatoes, sweet potatoes, brown rice, etc., because there simply isn't enough energy in greens to power the human body. Dr. John McDougall's website and books explain this in the clearest fashion I've seen.

Healthy Librarian

Jerry, I agree with you 100%! ANDI's just a guide that reminds me to pick the fruits & veggies that are highest in nutrients, but I also eat oatmeal, quinoa, beans, Ezekeial bread & wraps, sweet potatoes, squash, brown rice, etc, too every single day!! Just wanted to make the point that it is easy to eat too heavily in the grain area--at least for me, to the exclusion of plenty of salads & veggies. I also agree with you that McDougall has great info!

Steve Parker, M.D.

Another way to compare the nutrients in various foods is at NutrtitionData.com. Under "Tools," see "Compare Foods." It must be based on the USDA's Nutrient Database and gives values of about 30 different nutrients. Total antioxidant levels aren't included, if memory serves me well.

It's free, too.

-Steve

Thomas

Great stuff here. I have been eating according to McDougall for about a year. Doing very well. I probably need to get more greens in. I am not much for traditional salads, although Balsamic vinegar and brown mustard makes a decent dressing. Just lazy, I guess. Have to use the greens within a day or so of purchase, because they don't keep well. Quit coffee a few weeks ago.
Hopefully soon I can get off the BP and cholseterol meds. TC was 157 a few weeks ago.

Hank Roberts

Finally -- found a clear, understandable, visual chart showing proportions that makes food choices easy:

http://fanaticcook.blogspot.com/2009/04/omega-6-and-omega-3-in-foods.html

And she provides the Excel spreadsheet
http://spreadsheets.google.com/pub?key=pSxtKS08e_vablhPkWuTeJw
so you can present the data in your preferred way (the chart she shows is sorted by omega-6 amount; I'll sort it by omega-3 amount).

It makes -- strongly -- the same point made in Tribole's book, which arrived yesterday, about needing to do the addition to know your daily totals.

Much easier than writing down the numbers for each food and adding them up by hand.

And -- more informative than Tribole -- she gives the ratio as a decimal when it's "less than 1"

Of course Tribole has far more foods listed.

How did I ever live without knowing the numbers for opossum meat?

Chris G.

I don't think one needs to worry too much about the omega 6 : 3 ratio of foods that are low in fatty acids such as quinoa, brown rice, & lentils. There will be higher levels in higher fat food such as tofu & tempeh, however. For example, suppose quinoa, brown rice, & lentils had a ratio of 10, but comprised only 1 mg of omega 6, a healthy dose of flax or chia would easily offset this food. Both the CONCENTRATIONS and RATIOS of fatty acids in these foods is important!

Great post (again). Thanks!

Hank Roberts

uhhhhh ... hat tip to a commenter at 'fanaticcook' who spotted this. Better look carefully at 'nutritiondata' -- can you guess what this is?

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fast-foods-generic/9280/2
Total Omega-3 fatty acids: 800mg
Total Omega-6 fatty acids: 212mg

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