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October 22, 2011

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Comments

Ginger

Amazing! Thank you for yet again sharing such important information. Cheers

Penny

Congratulations on the birth of your granddaughter. Very exciting!!

I'm pretty sure that I have the 9p21 gene. It's good to have proof that diet trumps genes. Thanks for the info.

Chris G.

Congratulations on your expanding family.

Perhaps the most striking aspect of this is that 50% of us have the 9p21 gene. Stated another way, even if this doesn't apply to you, it applies to your children, parents, friends. Moreover, if the link is inflammation, chances are there are parallel situations where by other genes which cause disease via inflammation can be turned off via diet and exercise.

Given the incredible technological acceleration in gene sequencing and bioinformatic technology in the past decade, I suspect we are less than two decades away from genome sequencing as a common medical approach. As such, we'll all know how many copies we have of all of these genes in the near future.

The Healthy Librarian

Thank you Ginger, Penny, & Chris G.

Chris,

Actually, 75% of us have either 1 or 2 copies of 9P21. The quote in my post was a little ambiguous, so I did a little checking to clarify it.

This comes from a "hot-off-the-press" ahead of print article in:

Clin Chem. 2011 Oct 20. [Epub ahead of print]

Roberts, R, Stewart, AF, "9p21 and the Genetic Revolution for Coronary Artery Disease"


"9p21 occurs in 75% of the population except for African Americans and is associated with a 25% increased risk for CAD with 1 copy and a 50% increased risk with 2 copies. Perhaps the most remarkable finding is that 9p21 is independent of all known risk factors, indicating there are factors contributing to the pathogenesis of CAD that are yet unknown. 9p21 in individuals with premature CAD is associated with a 1-fold increase in risk, similar to that of smoking and cholesterol."

Cynthia Bailey MD, Dermatologist

I've purchased a Vitamix for my office and our entire staff has a raw veggie/fruit smoothie every day for exactly this and other positive health reasons. Sure beats the usual coffee and non-dairy creamer service offered in most offices. It's a little more work, but so worth it.

Thanks for keeping our eye on the important reasons WHY we should expend the effort and eat tons of fresh veggies and fruits instead of the usual modern empty/processed diet that's so ubiquitous.

And congrats on that grandbaby and time w/ the grandtoddler!

vegpedlr

Great work! I'm so excited that genetic research is backing up what has been observed for a long time. Lifestyle is far more important than genes. It's long been my belief that we ALL have heart disease in our genes, this study helps confirm that. But best of all, it means you don't have to be a helpless victim.

Gael in Vermont

Deb,
First of all...Congrats on the new little baby! Best of everything to you and the family! It sounds like nothing but fun to me. Having had a 72 hour labor from hell, I can totally relate! In the end, the BEST kid popped out.

So nice to have you back online! I had my yearly physical today with my wonderful doctor. She listens to all my rantings and ravings I read about here and she's interested in all of them. In light of Tara's WELL column today, we decided to put off the mammogram, and we even talked about endothelial cells! We also spoke about my plant-strong diet, Dr. E, and she's amazed that I'm sticking to it and doing so well. This new piece of research only fuels my fire more. It's both exciting and ground-breaking. Interesting to read about 9P21 having a hand in aneurysms...my dad not only had heart disease, but eventually also had dangerous surgery for his abdominal aneurysm-which eventually did him in. I didn't even connect those dots! Wow.

I'm so happy to be reading this. It's a great piece, Deb.
Mazel Tov...Gael

The Healthy Librarian

Dr. Bailey,

I hope your staff knows how lucky they are! As always, thank you so much for all your positive & generous feedback. It's so appreciated.

Vegpedlr,

I agree 100% With 75% of us carrying this gene--turns out your suspicions were right on the mark.

Gael,

Thanks of the congrats! 72 hours? OMG--I knew you were a strong woman, but that's ridiculous. I agree with your surprise about the aneurysms (me too!) --interesting stuff. Your doc sounds terrific & unusual (lucky you!)--I haven't had a chance to read the entire Well column on mammograms-just the first paragraph--and already I was wondering the same thing--less frequent mammograms. A lot to consider. I know you're a big fan of Dr. H. Gilbert Welch's as well. Almost a hometown boy.

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